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MDG's radiology lab serves those needing x-rays

Rhonda Janroy uses a digital screen to take a patient's x-ray.

Rhonda Janroy, 75th Medical Group lead diagnostic imaging technologist, takes a patient's x-ray at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, Nov. 5, 2021. Laboratory staff take and process digital x-rays which are then sent to a radiologist to examine and determine a patient's care. (U.S. Air Force photo by R. Nial Bradshaw)

Rhonda Janroy positions a patient for an x-ray

Rhonda Janroy, 75th Medical Group lead diagnostic imaging technologist, positions a patient for an x-ray at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, Nov. 5, 2021. Laboratory staff take and process digital x-rays that are then sent to a radiologist to examine and determine a patient's care. (U.S. Air Force photo by R. Nial Bradshaw)

Left to right, Tech. Sgt. Quincy Shay, Rhonda Janroy and Staff Sgt. Anthony Hiser, sitting on an x-ray table.

Left to right, Tech. Sgt. Quincy Shay, Rhonda Janroy and Staff Sgt. Anthony Hiser, 75th Medical Group radiology lab, provide x-ray services at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, Nov. 5, 2021. Laboratory staff take and process digital x-rays that are then sent to a radiologist to examine and determine a patient's care. (U.S. Air Force photo by R. Nial Bradshaw)

Staff Sgt. Anthony Hiser looks at an x-ray on an computer screen.

Staff Sgt. Anthony Hiser, 75th Medical Group NCO in charge of diagnostic imaging, prepares an x-ray for transfer to an off-site radiologist. Laboratory staff take and process digital x-rays that are then sent to a radiologist to examine and determine a patient's care. (U.S. Air Force photo by R. Nial Bradshaw)

HILL AIR FORCE BASE, Utah --

Unless you’ve needed an x-ray recently, you may not know that Hill Air Force Base has a radiology department.

The laboratory is run by four radiology technicians, one civilian and three military members: lead technologist Rhonda Janroy, flight chief Tech. Sgt. Quincy Shaw, NCO in charge Staff Sgt. Anthony Hiser and technician Senior Airman Ellis Matthews.

The laboratory sees about 12 patients a day, which Hiser says is the perfect amount to give each patient quality service without feeling rushed.

“Most of the patients we see here aren’t severely injured, so we are able to give each patient the proper care and attention they need and deserve,” Hiser said. “We can spend the time we need to do things right, and ensure we have a good x-ray.”

Hill’s laboratory offers basic x-ray services. As there is no radiologist in the lab, x-rays are sent digitally through a system called IMPAX to the Air Force Academy, where radiologists there will examine the x-ray and make a determination on the patient’s care.

Janroy, who manages IMPAX, said she having no radiologists at Hill has not hindered their ability to provide patients with the care they need.

“I actually enjoy the autonomy. We are the subject matter experts so when we see something that a radiologist should pay special attention to, we can let them know,” Janroy said.

Janroy has been at the base for 18 years.  Although she plans to retire within a few years, she has enjoyed her time working in the radiology department.

“It has been a very good job,” she said.