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Wildlife officials urge motorists to watch for deer

Deer cross a road in front of a vehicle.

Deer cross Wardleigh Road Nov. 10, 2021, at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. Due to increased deer activity this time of year, drivers are urged to slow down and watch for deer, especially at dawn and dusk, which coincides with peak commuting hours. (U.S. Air Force photo by Todd Cromar)

A deer camouflaged by shrubs.

A deer camouflaged by shrubs near Wardleigh Road Nov. 10, 2021, at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. Due to increased deer activity this time of year, drivers are urged to slow down and watch for deer, especially at dawn and dusk, which coincides with peak commuting hours. (U.S. Air Force photo by Todd Cromar)

Deer grazing in a field.

Deer graze in a field near Wardleigh Road Nov. 10, 2021, at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. Due to increased deer activity this time of year, drivers are urged to slow down and watch for deer, especially at dawn and dusk, which coincides with peak commuting hours. (U.S. Air Force photo by Todd Cromar)

HILL AIR FORCE BASE, Utah -- Wildlife officials urge motorists to drive cautiously due to the increased deer activity on Hill’s roadways this time of year.

While deer are a year-round hazard – on and off base – October and November is when the highest number of vehicle and deer collisions occur across the state. This is because it is migration and mating season for deer, making it more likely for deer to run across roads.

Deer activity is more likely to occur in the early morning and around sunset, which coincides with peak commuting hours. This is also when low-light conditions make it difficult for motorists to see.

Tips to avoid deer collisions:

• Slow down. Be especially alert at dawn and dusk.
• Scan both sides of the road as you drive, especially where shrubs or grasses are near the road.
• Do not drive distracted. Put away phones and other distractions.
• When possible, use high-beam headlights to further illuminate the road and look for animal “eye shine,” which can be seen from a distance.
• If you see a deer on or near the road, slow down and be sure to watch for more to follow.
• Do not swerve for a deer or small animals. Brake and stay in your lane.
• If you hit a deer, and your vehicle is damaged, stop at the scene, get your car off the road if possible, turn on your vehicle hazard lights and call law enforcement, or 911 if you were injured.
• Do not approach an injured deer. They are capable of causing serious injury.

(Portions of this article were taken from wildlife.utah.gov)