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F-15 Canopy Shop gives pilots clear view

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ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. -- Randy Hough, 572nd Commodities Maintenance Squadron sheet metal mechanic, explains how he trims the fairing for an F-15 aircraft canopy at Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, Feb. 11, 2021. There are about 300 fasteners holes that hold the canopy to the frame and when those are in place a final inspection is performed to ensure the canopy fits to the frame, in accordance to the technical order tolerances. (U.S. Air Force photo by Joseph Mather)

man standing

ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. – Randy Hough, 572nd Commodities Maintenance Squadron sheet metal mechanic, works alongside an F-15 aircraft canopy at Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, Feb. 11, 2021. Once repaired, the canopy is re-assembled and sent for a final paint before being placed into a crate and returned to the customer or used by the supply chain to support orders that need to be filled. (U.S. Air Force photo by Joseph Mather)

ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. --

man standing
ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. -- Randy Hough, 572nd Commodities Maintenance Squadron sheet metal mechanic, trims a fairing for an F-15 aircraft canopy at Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, Feb. 11, 2021. After the canopy has its necessary repairs, it is resealed where the canopy sits on the airframe. (U.S. Air Force photo by Joseph Mather)
man standing
F-15 Canopy Shop gives pilots clear view
ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. -- Randy Hough, 572nd Commodities Maintenance Squadron sheet metal mechanic, trims a fairing for an F-15 aircraft canopy at Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, Feb. 11, 2021. After the canopy has its necessary repairs, it is resealed where the canopy sits on the airframe. (U.S. Air Force photo by Joseph Mather)
Photo By: Joseph Mather
VIRIN: 210211-F-ED303-1002
The F-15 Canopy Shop’s eye for details gives pilots a clear view of the mission.

The Warner Robins Air Logistics Complex 572nd Commodities Maintenance Squadron has a team that specializes in providing that clear view.

Having a clean serviceable canopy is important to a pilot’s visibility, said Alberto Garza-Mayer, 572nd Commodities Maintenance Squadron team lead.

“We are set up to be part of the sustainment effort for F-15 aircraft canopies,” said Garza-Mayer. “We are part of the team that does the replacement parts like the canopies, stabilizers or any of the other flight controls that keep F-15 aircraft flying.”

As the aircraft flies missions, the canopy encounters dust and debris from a variety of situations.

“After a while, flying during storms or other types of weather conditions, the canopy will develop hazing to point it will not be serviceable anymore and will need to be replaced,” said Garza-Mayer.

When the F-15 canopies come in from the field, they may need a replacement of glass or complete refurbishment. That’s when Garza-Mayer team goes to work.

man standing
ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. -- Randy Hough, 572nd Commodities Maintenance Squadron sheet metal mechanic, cuts a piece of sheet metal at Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, Feb. 11, 2021. When all the necessary repairs are completed the canopy is sent to have a final paint applied. (U.S. Air Force photo by Joseph Mather)
man standing
F-15 Canopy Shop gives pilots clear view
ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. -- Randy Hough, 572nd Commodities Maintenance Squadron sheet metal mechanic, cuts a piece of sheet metal at Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, Feb. 11, 2021. When all the necessary repairs are completed the canopy is sent to have a final paint applied. (U.S. Air Force photo by Joseph Mather)
Photo By: Joseph Mather
VIRIN: 210211-F-ED303-1004
“The canopies will get disassembled and de-painted,” said Garza-Mayer. “After it is disassembled, we do a frame inspection check to see if the canopy is still serviceable.”

After the frame inspection, the canopy refurbishment process begins.

“Once the canopy goes through its necessary repairs, it is resealed where the canopy sits on to the airframe,” said Garza-Mayer. “Then all the holes are located to drill. There are about 300 fasteners holes that hold the canopy to the frame. We drill the holes, then trim it to fit within technical order tolerances, make sure it fits, do a final inspection, and install it onto the frame.”

Garza-Mayer said it is a 60-day process to complete a canopy.

“Last year, we averaged six or seven canopies a month, so we were in the 80-plus canopies completion range,” said Garza-Mayer. “This year, the numbers have been lowered, so we have been doing around four canopies a month.”

The F-15 canopy refurbishment is a process Garza-Mayer’s team takes pride in doing.

“We have a lot of pride in what we do, because we know we are the only shop in the Air Force that has this mission,” said Garza-Mayer.