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OQ-2A Aerial Target

Radioplane OQ-2A Aerial Target

Radioplane OQ-2A Aerial Target

Radioplane OQ-2A Aerial Target

Crew:  None
Engine:  One O-15-1 two-cylinder, air-cooled, simultaneously-firing, two-cycle; 6 hp
Wingspan:  13 ft 3 in
Length:  8 ft 8 in
Height:  2 ft 8 in
Weight:  max: 108 lbs
Speed:  max: 90 mph
Endurance:  60 minutes
Ceiling:  8,000 ft
Armament:  None
Cost:  $1,500

This radio-controlled aerial target was used for antiaircraft gunnery training in World War II. It was designed and built by the Radioplane Company in Van Nuys, California, after an original design created by former actor and aircraft modeller Reginald Denny. The OQ-2A was launched by a catapult and recovered after the flight by descending under a 24-foot parachute.

The plane was flown by a ground controller using a "beep" box, so called due to the tones transmitted to the plane's control system in flight. For training realism, the "pilot" flew the small craft using enemy aircraft attack tactics. This gave the trainee antiaircraft gunners an idea of what to expect when faced with the real thing later.