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AGM-45 "Shrike" Anti-Radiation Missile

Texas Instruments AGM-45 "Shrike" Anti-Radiation Missile

Texas Instruments AGM-45 "Shrike" Anti-Radiation Missile

Texas Instruments AGM-45 "Shrike" Anti-Radiation Missile

Propulsion:   Rocketdyne or Aerojet solid-fuel rocket motor
Wingspan:   3 ft 0 in
Length:  1 0 ft 0 in
Diameter:   0 ft 8 in
Weight:   390 lbs
Speed:   Approximately Mach 2
Range:   Up to 28 miles
Armament:   147 or 149 lb conventional blast-fragmentation high-explosive warhead
Cost:   $32,000

The Texas Instruments AGM-45 Shrike was a passive, rocket-powered air-to-ground guided missile designed to destroy radiating radar transmitters directing either enemy antiaircraft guns or surface-to-air missiles (SAMs). It was the first dedicated anti-radiation missile employed by the U.S. Air Force and Navy. Designed by the U.S. Naval Weapons Center beginning in 1958, the Shrike homed on the electromagnetic signals emitted by enemy ground-based radar sites as they tracked American aircraft.

By the time production ended in 1982, about 20,000 copies of the more than 20 different versions of the missile had been built. The last Shrikes were withdrawn from the U.S. inventory in 1992 in favor of the AGM-88 High-speed Anti-Radiation Missile (HARM).

The Ogden Air Logistics Center at Hill AFB first became associated with Shrike missile support in 1963. The base also performed the conversion of F-4Cs to the "Wild Weasel" radar-homing and attack role using Shrikes beginning in 1966. Hill began producing F-4G Wild Weasels from F-4E aircraft beginning in 1977.